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Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone

Did you know that CORN SILK has medicinal properties?

The “beard” of corn on the cob is called CORN SILK. If you want to use it for medicinal purposes I suggest you only use the silk from organic corn. Corn Silk is easy to dry for later use. Just spread it out on a mosquito screen, in a basket etc. and within a few days it should be well dried. Store it in a sealed glass jar away from the sun for future use in form of a tea or make a tincture.

MEDICINAL USE: As a soothing anti-inflammatory its primary focus is the urinary system. It can be applied in urinary tract infections, kidney stones and bed wetting formulas for children. Some research suggests that corn silk also promotes bile flow.

SPROUTING PART 2 – HOW TO SPROUT YOUR OWN SEEDS

For an actual demonstration on how to sprout check out my DVD, “Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone” visit http://herbalinstructions.com/

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

➣ A glass jar, any size from about 1 litre to 4 litres will do; wide mouth jars are the most practical
➣ Nylon mosquito screen, big enough to cover the opening of the jar and rubber band to secure it
➣ Fresh water
➣ Seeds for sprouting
a. I suggest you begin, using only one type of seed per jar. Once you have gained some experience, have fun experimenting, creating your own special mixes.
b. How many seeds to use? As the seeds absorb the water and begin to sprout, they will expand; different seeds will expand to different degrees. For example, radish seeds will expand more than sunflower seeds.

As a rule, fill the jar up to 1-2 cm with dried seeds. Using too few or too many, does not matter. You will learn quickly the proper amounts for the different types of seed you use.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. CLEANING

A. Place seeds in (wide mouth) glass jar; when using larger seeds like peas use more seeds
B. Cover jar with mesh and secure with rubber band
C. Rinse by adding water, swirl and drain

2. SOAKING

A. Add cool water, 5 – 10 cm above seeds and let sit 4 – 8 hours or over-night;
NOTE: The length of time for soaking the seeds depends on the type of seed used; check internet for soaking charts or refer to my next post.
B. Drain water, rinse and drain water again. Seeds should be damp but not “swimming” in water.

3. GROWING

A. Invert and prop jar at an angle in a bowl so that excess water can drain; preferably keep in dark place.
B. Twice a day rinse seeds with cool/room temperature water, swirl jar gently, drain and repeat step 3A.
C. Depending on the seeds, it will take 2 – 5 days for the seeds to sprout to a length of ½ – 5 cm when they are ready to be enjoyed.

4. EATING & STORING

Eat sprouts right away or store them in the fridge in a glass container or plastic bag. Treat them like you would any other food that can spoil.

Meal Suggestions

Sprouts can be added to salads, sandwiches, tacos, wraps, soups (just before serving), spaghetti sauce, omelets, green drinks and baking (1/2 cup of sprouts per loaf; add to liquid ingredients). Sprouted seeds may also be sautéed, blanched or steamed.

Sprouting beans will soften them enough, making them suitable for creating spreads such as hummus.

BE CREATIVE and most of all ENJOY!

To order the DVD “Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone – A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating You Own Herbal Preparations”, visit http://herbalinstructions.com/order-dvd/

SPROUTING YOUR OWN SEEDS – WHY & HOW

Heading into the fall and winter seasons it is good to know that, even in the north, we can still grow some of our own food, packed with vitality and nutrients, helping to fend off those pesky colds and flus that are certain to make their come back.

PART 1 – WHY TO SPROUT YOUR OWN SEEDS

Today’s post covers WHY to sprout. In the following posts I will provide specific instructions plus additional information.

Why Sprout?

Sprouting is a great way of adding high quality nutrition to your daily life. Sprouts are the only food source that is still alive when we eat it. The process is easy and can be done by anyone with supplies found in every home kitchen. No extra space is required, even the smallest kitchen will do. Sprouting is very economical and therefore is suitable for any budget.

Any seeds and nuts can be used for sprouting; however, it is best to use certified organic seeds and only those that are intended as food crop rather than farm planting seeds. This minimizes the risk of contamination.

To my knowledge, organic sprouting seeds have not been implicated in any outbreak of food poisoning.

Sprouts contain the highest concentration of phytonutrients per calorie of any food. Phytonutrients provide a great spectrum of health benefits.

Benefits of Eating Sprouts

➣ Great source of nutrition; sprouts are rich in vitamins, minerals, proteins and enzymes
➣ Support and nourishment for the entire body including immune system and cardio vascular health
➣  Very easily digested and assimilated
➣ Improvement of the efficiency of the digestive system
➣ Protection against free radical damage
➣ Very inexpensive
➣ Available year-round even when other vegetables and fruits are not available 
➣ Easy to grow at home
➣ Great variety of usages
➣ Plus lots more

Commonly Used Seeds for Sprouting

Alfalfa – Beans (various) – Broccoli – Chia – Chickpeas – Fenugreek – Lentils – Mustard – Peas – Pumpkin – Radish – Red Clover – Sunflower

NOTE: Most seeds and nuts can be used for sprouting but some may require more equipment and experience than the ones mentioned above.
Avoid sprouting seeds from plants that have poisonous parts.
You can save some of your garden seeds and use them for sprouting i.e. radish, caragana seeds

STAY TUNED for next week’s post on HOW to sprout.

Jungle Juice Recipe

Thank you for your interest in my signature drink. Here is the information and recipe you were asking for. The u-tube video, demonstrating how to create this delicious concoction, is a segment taken from my DVD, Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone. A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating Your Own Herbal Preparations. The DVD is available from my website, www.herbalinstructions.com or you can contact me directly.

Click link below for recipe:

Jungle Juice

Happy herbaling and green blessings,

Gudrun

 

The Magic of Mother Earth

The abundance and beauty of the Earth at this time of the year in the Peace Country is amazing. I encourage you to bring some of the magic of Mother Earth into your home by adding the wild greens to your food, preparing a cup of tea with fresh plants or harvesting and drying herbs for later use. Goldenrod is one of those amazing herbs you can see everywhere right now.

Goldenrod is a fairly tall plant with beautiful, vibrant golden-yellow flowers. You will find it in dry woodlands, forest clearings and roadsides.

The Latin name Solidago originates from “solidus” & “ago,” Solidus, meaning “healthy and strong,” and ago meaning “to make whole.” Both of these terms refer to the plant’s ability to heal wounds.

Some common names for Goldenrod from various cultures also give an indication for its medicinal use as a wound healing herb, for example in Germany the herb is often called “Fastening Herb”. In fact in ancient German history Goldenrod was gathered as a wound herb before engaging in battle, just in case it was needed.

However, the focus today for its use has shifted from a wound healing aid, to a very reliable herb to support the kidneys. It promotes the elimination of urine and is applied for acute as well as chronic conditions of the kidneys and bladder including inflammation. In addition, it has been found to support the body during times of upper respiratory infections, especially when dealing with a chronic situation.

For medicinal purposes the leaves and flowers (early flowering stage) are being harvested and may be used fresh or dried. The fresh leaves and flowers can be used for wound healing or made into a tea, which can also be used as a wound wash. The dried herb may be used in the form of a tea as well but also as a tincture. A tincture is an alcoholic extract of a plant and is more concentrated than an herbal tea. The “crafty” person might want to try to use the flowers as a natural dye.

This summer Goldenrod has been brightening up the landscape in so many places and the quality of it has been superb. Many times you will find it being “infested” with many small bugs, but this year the only insects I have watched enjoying the bright, yellow flowers are butterflies and bees!

If you are not sure how to prepare the herbs, remember that the DVD Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone provides clear and easy to follow instructions, teaching a great variety of herbal preparations. Check my website www.herbalinstructions.com for more information.

Disclaimer

This information is not intended for the use of diagnosing any disease, condition or prescribing any treatment whatsoever. The use of any of the herbs and preparations is the sole responsibility of each individual and does not replace the services and advice of a medical practitioner and qualified healthcare provider. Consult a qualified healthcare professional before making medical decisions or if you have questions about your individual medical situation. No responsibility is assumed should the information be used in place of a licensed medical practitioner’s services.

WEEDS FOR WELLNESS – A GUIDE TO YOUR BACKYARD PHARMACY

CHICKWEED – Stellaris Media

Chickweed is one of my favorite herbs. You can use all aerial parts of the plant. My husband has gotten into trouble more than once when he got rid of it from garden beds. Chickens and small birds enjoy feeding on Chickweed as well – probably the reason for its name. Chickweed is very nourishing, it contains many minerals and vitamins such as vitamin C, copper, iron, phosphorus and potassium.

My preference is to use Chickweed raw in salads, added to smoothies and the Jungle Juice, and as a garnish on sandwiches and in wraps. The flavour is mild and as with many herbs the younger plants are preferable. Especially when using it raw for salads and toppings, the stems of more mature plants get stringy, so you may only want to us the (flowering) tops. Try mixing it into cream cheese or make a herbal butter by adding chives and chickweed and maybe a bit of flax oil.

You can also add Chickweed to soups and other cooked dishes.  However, you don’t want to cook Chickweed for more than a few minutes; therefore I suggest you add it towards the end after any other vegetables and greens have their required tenderness.

Medicinally Chickweed is very soothing to the skin. I like to use it externally for skin conditions such as eczema and itchy skin. It also has a cooling effect. Apparently the herb is also used as a tea in natural weight loss programs; however, I do not have any personal experience with this application. Less well known is the fact that Chickweed helps to soothe stomach ulcers and other digestive ailments.

Have fun, be creative and I hope you will enjoy Chickweed as much as I do.

Green blessings,

Gudrun

Greetings from Down Under

“Nobody can do for little children what grandparents do.
Grandparents sort of sprinkle stardust over the lives of little children.”

– Alex Haley

Greetings from Down Under in Australia where I get to bond with the latest addition to our family, our fourth grand daughter, 2 1/2 weeks old. I am very grateful to have the opportunity to be part of these precious moments in life.

You might want to check this out: Gift of Grandparents

https://stevemccurry.blog/2019/04/03/gift-of-grandparents-2/

Green Blessings,

Gudrun

THANK YOU!

THANK YOU to all of you for your wonderful and kind words in response to my TEDx talk! The positive feedback has been overwhelming and at the same so rewarding. The experience of the event will always remain a highlight of my life and I am so grateful to have had this opportunity.

If you have not watched the talk yet, please find the link below. The talk is only 11 minutes long.

https://youtu.be/Fit7BqpBDLE

Thank you again for your support.

Green blessings,

Gudrun

CURRIED ZUCCHINI BROCCOLI SOUP

This soup is fast and easy to prepare – as always, my preference. It has become one of our favorites during the winter time. Even the grand children (1 ½ – 4 ½ years old) enjoy it immensely.

The soup is lightly curried to allow the delicate flavor of the zucchini to come through. You can adjust the flavor by adding more, or less curry powder.

Curried Zucchini Broccoli SoupINGREDENTS

  • 2 tsp. butter or coconut oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 5 cups fresh broccoli
  • 2 pounds fresh zucchini, sliced
  • 2 cups vegetable or chicken broth
  • 1 tsp. curry powder
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • Salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

  1. Melt coconut oil/butter in a large saucepan over medium heat
  2. Add onion and cook until it begins to soften
  3. Add remaining ingredients except for sour cream (vegetable/chicken broth, zucchini, broccoli, curry powder; if using unsalted vegetable or chicken stock add large pinch of salt)
  4. Bring to boil
  5. Reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender (about 25 minutes)
  6. Allow soup to cool slightly; then transfer to blender or food processor
  7. Puree soup until smooth but still has some green flecks
  8. Return soup to saucepan and stir in sour cream.
  9. Reheat gently over low heat
  10. Adjust seasoning to taste
  11. ENJOY

MYSTERY SOLVED – IS EATING BREAD MAKING YOU SICK?

Finally, I believe, I have found the answer to a question that has been puzzling me for years. Why is it that many gluten-sensitive people or even celiacs can eat bread in Europe without experiencing any reactions, but get sick or at least have symptoms of indigestion when they consume bread in North America?

Breads in Europe are made with yeast. The yeast helps to break down the protein lectin. Lectins can be a culprit for a great variety of health issues. In contrast, since 1950, yeast in North America has been replaced with the rising agent transglutaminase. Transglutaminase is also known as “meat-glue”; it is being used as a binding agent to “glue together” ground meat and seafood. According to Dr. Steven Gundry, transglutaminase makes us more sensitive to gluten. And to make matters worse, transglutaminase is apparently also being used in gluten free products. No wonder so many people are having trouble these days digesting bread, assuming they are gluten-sensitive when in fact, gluten is not the offender.

The need to continuously educate ourselves is of utmost importance. Unfortunately we cannot rely on or trust government and industry to make decisions that are in our best interest.

Green blessings,
Gudrun