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SPROUTING YOUR OWN SEEDS – WHY & HOW

Heading into the fall and winter seasons it is good to know that, even in the north, we can still grow some of our own food, packed with vitality and nutrients, helping to fend off those pesky colds and flus that are certain to make their come back.

PART 1 – WHY TO SPROUT YOUR OWN SEEDS

Today’s post covers WHY to sprout. In the following posts I will provide specific instructions plus additional information.

Why Sprout?

Sprouting is a great way of adding high quality nutrition to your daily life. Sprouts are the only food source that is still alive when we eat it. The process is easy and can be done by anyone with supplies found in every home kitchen. No extra space is required, even the smallest kitchen will do. Sprouting is very economical and therefore is suitable for any budget.

Any seeds and nuts can be used for sprouting; however, it is best to use certified organic seeds and only those that are intended as food crop rather than farm planting seeds. This minimizes the risk of contamination.

To my knowledge, organic sprouting seeds have not been implicated in any outbreak of food poisoning.

Sprouts contain the highest concentration of phytonutrients per calorie of any food. Phytonutrients provide a great spectrum of health benefits.

Benefits of Eating Sprouts

➣ Great source of nutrition; sprouts are rich in vitamins, minerals, proteins and enzymes
➣ Support and nourishment for the entire body including immune system and cardio vascular health
➣  Very easily digested and assimilated
➣ Improvement of the efficiency of the digestive system
➣ Protection against free radical damage
➣ Very inexpensive
➣ Available year-round even when other vegetables and fruits are not available 
➣ Easy to grow at home
➣ Great variety of usages
➣ Plus lots more

Commonly Used Seeds for Sprouting

Alfalfa – Beans (various) – Broccoli – Chia – Chickpeas – Fenugreek – Lentils – Mustard – Peas – Pumpkin – Radish – Red Clover – Sunflower

NOTE: Most seeds and nuts can be used for sprouting but some may require more equipment and experience than the ones mentioned above.
Avoid sprouting seeds from plants that have poisonous parts.
You can save some of your garden seeds and use them for sprouting i.e. radish, caragana seeds

STAY TUNED for next week’s post on HOW to sprout.

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