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Herbal Healing

FOOD FOR THOUGHT – DIGITAL ID

Great opportunity, JCCF webinar plus more: JCCF INFO »

The next step of surveillance is encroaching on our freedoms and privacy quickly – all under the pretense of being of great benefit to humanity.

Way too many people are quick to accept this intrusive technology without questioning it. As with so many developments, it is too late to “wake up” once the systems have been implemented.

As always, take the time to educate yourself!

“Arguing that you don’t care about privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.” Edward Snowden

WEEDS FOR WELLNESS – CHICKWEED

I am grateful to Mother Earth for sharing so many treasures with us. This time of the year provides great opportunities to show our appreciation and support for the Earth. Despite the relentless abuse and exploitation, we continue to be blessed with her beauty and abundance. The big question is, for how much longer though if humankind refuses to change course.

Chickweed with its little white flowers is one of my favourite herbs in the summer. It is a staple in our daily diet. The grand kids enjoy picking and eating it straight, we add it to salads, green smoothies, the Jungle Juice, scrambled eggs and whenever we feel like some fresh greens.

The fresh leaves can be used as a poultice for inflammations, ulcers, abscesses. The poultice has an anti-itching effect.

Enjoy and happy herballing this summer.

CHICKWEED – Stellariia media – Caryophylaceae

PARTS USED
Whole plant (aerial parts)

TIME OF HARVEST
All year round; preferably younger plants

NUTRITIONAL VALUE
High in Vitamin C & A, minerals

THERAPEUTICS
Primarily used EXTERNALLY
Itchy, irritated skin (i.e. chickenpox, eczema)
Wounds (cuts, abrasions)
Soothing to eyes (red or swollen eyes)

INTERNALLY
Conditions of respiratory system incl. coughs, colds etc.
Soothing and cleansing to entire system

PREPARATIONS
Infusion (internal/external application)
Juice – Ointments/salves – Food

ACTIONS
Vulnerary – Emollient – Anti-rheumatic

GENERAL
Very mild herb – Great as food – Can be eaten in large quantities

As always, green blessings,|

Gudrun

 

Inspirational Thought of the Day

“Age is a quality of mind:
If you have left your dreams behind
If hope is cold,
If you no longer look ahead,
If your ambition-fires are dead,
Then you are old.

But if from life you take the best,
And if in life you keep the jest,
If love you hold,
No matter how the years go by,
No matter how the birthdays fly,
You are not old. ”

– Author Unknown

FOOD AS MEDICINE

HE THAT TAKES MEDICINE AND NEGLECTS DIET, WASTES THE TIME OF HIS DOCTOR. – Ancient Chinese Proverb

Summer is a great time to re-assess one’s diet and cultivate new eating habits by adding more fresh, organic vegetables, herbs and fruits to the daily diet.

If you have not yet watched the documentary: FORKS OVER KNIVES, I highly recommend, you do. This film presents evidence for the fact that most degenerative dis-eases can be controlled or even reversed with a plant-based diet. The film is very well done and worthwhile watching.

ONE QUARTER OF WHAT YOU EAT, KEEPS YOU ALIVE. THE OTHER THREE QUARTERS KEEPS YOUR DOCTOR ALIVE. – Egyptian Proverb

Website: https://www.forksoverknives.com/

Green Blessings,
Gudrun

HOPE

“Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul and sings the tunes without the words and never stops at all”.  – Emily Dickinson

Hope is an essential element in any form of healing. Dr. Edward Bach said to never take away from anyone the hope for healing. I am hoping, wishing and praying that this year more and more people will re-connect to nature, so that Mother Earth will receive the much needed support for her healing. Everyone of us can make a difference. Let’s shift our focus to things that really matter and what life is truly about.

Green Blessings,
Gudrun

Rosehips High in Vitamin C

Rosehips are from the Wild Rose (Rosa canina). They are especially high in vitamin C but also contain vitamin A, B1 and B2 in the pulp. Vitamin C was first discovered in Rosehips. Long before the discovery of vitamin C Rosehip tea was used for the common cold and locally for inflamed and bleeding gums.

Most animals are able to manufacture their own vitamin C but because of a lack of a major enzyme in the human liver, the human body is unable to manufacture its own vitamin C. This is why we need to ensure adequate vitamin C intake through our diet or supplements. Rosehips also help to maintain healthy collagen, the substance that holds trillions of cells together in our body.

ROSEHIP TEA

Following are two of my favourite ways of preparing Rosehip tea:

1. My preference is to make a cold infusion and let it sit over night or at least a few hours before straining it. Cold infusions have the advantage of preserving the mineral content provided by the herbs.

2. Make a cold infusion and then slowly bring the infusion with the rosehips to simmer to make a decoction.

For instructions of the different water extractions such as cold infusions and decoctions I suggest you refer to disc 1 of the DVD “Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone”.

http://herbalinstructions.com/order-dvd/

GREEEN BLESSINGS FROM HAIDA GWAII

Green blessings from Haida Gwaii (formerly Queen Charlotte Islands). We are enjoying time out in nature: camping, hiking, biking, nature art, beach combing, photography…

Until the next time,

Gudrun

GRATEFUL FOR BOUNTIFUL HARVEST

Mother Nature will always be my favorite medicine chest. I am so grateful for having followed the path of learning from the Earth with the help of many incredible individuals. I consider myself extremely blessed for all the tools and knowledge I have acquired over the years. Thank you to all the people who, so freely, have shared their wisdom and knowledge (knowingly or not) with me.

Green Blessings,

Gudrun

DELICIOUS FLAVOURS FROM NATURE

One of my favourites is to create drinks with the delicate and subtle flavours of nature.

There really is no recipe; as always my favourite recipes are easy to create.

I add flowers to my glass of water, let the glass sit in the sun (or not) for a short while before enjoying it.

Needless to say, you only want to use nontoxic, edible flowers. I suggest, you do NOT use the flowers from plants bought at any of the stores because most of them will have been treated with chemicals.

Examples of flowers: Dandelion, Borage, Wild Rose, Fireweed, Pansies, Lilacs.

Be creative and enjoy.

Green Blessings,

Gudrun

WEEDS FOR WELLNESS – DANDELION

Finally the bright yellow flowers are brightening the landscape – a sure sign that spring is here to stay. Hard to believe that herbalists have great appreciation for this marvelous creation of nature? We use flowers, buds, leaves and roots as food and medicine. My grandkids nibble on the flowers and young leaves.

Last year I made a crown out of dandelion flowers for my then 4 year old grand daughter. She was wearing it proudly as we walked into Canadian Tire. With great joy I observed the reactions of customers especially when we were wandering around the Round-up shelf. So much fun!

Be creative and “brave” – eat flowers and young leaves, add both to salads, make a Dandelion flower cold infusion. Decorate ice creams and cakes … and most of all, have fun and be grateful for the gift of this plant that most consider to be a pesky weed.

DANDELION – Taraxacum off. – Asteraceae famly

PARTS USED: Roots, stems, leaves and flowers

HARVEST TIME
Roots: Spring before flowering or fall after first frost
Leaves: Early spring, throughout summer (leaves increase in bitter taste with age)
Flowers: When in full bloom

NUTRITIONAL VALUE
Rich in minerals such as calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, and zinc. Vitamins A, B complex, C and D.
Carotenoids, fatty acids, flavenoids and phytosterols.
NOTE: The roots are exceptionally high in vitamin A

THERAPEUTIC ACTIONS
Leaf: Diuretic (high in potassium) – Choleretic (stimulates bile production by liver) – Aperient (mild laxative)
Root: Bitter digestive tonic; nutritive – Choleretic, cholagogue – Aperient, laxative – Anti-rheumatic, anit-inflammatory (animal studies)
Sap: Keratolytic (breaks down outer layer of skin)

INDICATIONS
Leaf: Water retention
Root: Inadequate bile production, gallstones, liver/gall bladder insufficiency, congestive jaundice, Dyspepsia, lack of appetite
Sap of stalks, roots, or leaves: Warts, cankers

FORM OF PREPARATION
Infusions (leaves; flowers) – Decoctions (root) – Tinctures – Vinegars (roots, leaves, flowers) – Infused Oils – Salves – Food (leaves, petals, young roots)

CONTRA-INDICATIONS
No reported toxicity; however some people experience sensitivity reactions