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healing plants

SPRING CLEANING THE NATURAL WAY

Have you ever wondered about the safety of the cleaning products you use in your home?

How about tackling spring cleaning this year with some home-made products that are easy and fun to prepare while at the same time getting the job done?

Nature offers many alternatives to chemicals; alternatives that are powerful anti-microbial. For example, essential oil of Oregano kills a broad spectrum of bacteria including E.coli and spores from anthrax. It can therefore be substituted for bleach products such as Clorox.

Rosemary is another great option because of its natural antibacterial and antiseptic properties. In times of the plague, Rosemary was worn around the neck for its antiseptic qualities.

Below find two simple recipes – shared with permission from Theresa Mieseler, author of Beyond Rosemary, Basil, and Thyme, available from https://www.shadyacres.com/ and Amazon. The book includes 25 recipes.

Countertop Spray Cleaner

1 tablespoon liquid soap, such as Biokleen
¼ teaspoon baking soda
8 to 10 drops Rosemary essential oil
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1 cup distilled water

Combine all ingredients and pour into a spray bottle. It will fizz initially and then settle down. Shake before spraying on the surface—wipe off with a soft cloth.

Rosemary and Geranium Essential Oil All-Purpose Cleaner     

1 cup rubbing alcohol
1 cup distilled water
20-25 drops Rosemary essential oil
10 drops Geranium essential oil     

Combine all ingredients and pour into a spray bottle. Before use — shake well.

ELDERBERRY SYRUP

Elderberry syrup is a delicious and healthy way to support your IMMUNE SYSTEM. One of its additional great benefits is its ANTI-CATARRHAL action. This means it helps to prevent mucous formation and aids in the removal of excess mucous. This is especially useful at this time of the year, when so many of us are dealing with colds, runny noses and coughs, all of which are accompanied by an excess of mucous production.

Elderberry syrup is safe for children and can be taken straight, added to soda water, smoothies, beverages, ice cream, yogurt etc.

ACTIONS:
               Immune System Support/Stimulant – Anti-Viral – Anti-catarrhal – Anti-Inflammatory

INDICATIONS:
               Colds – Flu – Fever (reduces symptoms and duration) – Upper Respiratory Infections – Allergies – Urinary Tract Infections

PLAGUED BY A PERSISTENT COUGH?

Here are some tips and simple home remedies to support the body in overcoming this affliction regardless of what causes the cough.

1. Cut out all mucous forming foods, especially dairy and wheat as well as all foods you know you are sensitive to.

2. Change your diet to at least 70% raw and drink lots of carrot juice and green smoothies.

3. Drink lots of good water – city water is typically full of chemicals and not recommended for consumption on a regular basis.

4. Keep the chest warm with appropriate clothing.

5. Apply poultices to the chest, i.e. onion poultice or castor oil pack (see DVD “Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone”, Disc 2 for instructions)

6. Cough Syrup – homemade, simple yet effective:
Cut up an onion, place in glass jar and cover with honey (honey can be hard; the juice of the onion will liquefy the honey).
Let sit for several hours to several days and strain. Take 1 tsp. as needed.

7. Herbs to use are the ones with anti-microbial properties such as Garlic and Thyme and expectorants for example Mullein (Verbascum thapsus), Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and Fenugreek seed (Trigonella foenum-graecum).

You can find good combination teas for the support of the respiratory system at the health food stores.

MYSTERY SOLVED – IS EATING BREAD MAKING YOU SICK?

Finally, I believe, I have found the answer to a question that has been puzzling me for years. Why is it that many gluten-sensitive people or even celiacs can eat bread in Europe without experiencing any reactions, but get sick or at least have symptoms of indigestion when they consume bread in North America?

Breads in Europe are made with yeast. The yeast helps to break down the protein lectin. Lectins can be a culprit for a great variety of health issues. In contrast, since 1950, yeast in North America has been replaced with the rising agent transglutaminase. Transglutaminase is also known as “meat-glue”; it is being used as a binding agent to “glue together” ground meat and seafood. According to Dr. Steven Gundry, transglutaminase makes us more sensitive to gluten. And to make matters worse, transglutaminase is apparently also being used in gluten free products. No wonder so many people are having trouble these days digesting bread, assuming they are gluten-sensitive when in fact, gluten is not the offender.

The need to continuously educate ourselves is of utmost importance. Unfortunately we cannot rely on or trust government and industry to make decisions that are in our best interest.

Green blessings,
Gudrun

Amazing ONLINE OPPORTUNITY coming up November 5-8

The FIRST CANADIAN HERB CONFERENCE (online), Plant Medicine as People’s Medicine, focuses on how plants can help heal ourselves and the community.
 
SAVE $20 off your registration, enter SAVINGS CODE, gudrun20.
 
OPEN to EVERYONE – from the beginner herbalist to the expert, student & practitioner of all walks of life.
Take advantage of this great opportunity to enrich your life, gain new tools and knowledge, get inspired, and connect with like minded people. Includes: marketplace & tearooms for networking. Choose from three different registration packages.
 
Visit http://www.herbconference.com/ for more details and to register
— SAVINGS code: gudrun20

 
My workshop topics:
 
1. Virtual Herb Walk – The Difference between an Herb and a Weed is a Judgement
2. Earth Wisdom – Communicating with Plant Spirit (scheduled for two mornings, each day will include a different morning meditation connecting to plant spirit)
 
Please share the information freely, including the savings code. Hope to “see you there”!
 
Green Blessings,
Gudrun
 
http://www.herbconference.com/

CANADIAN HERB CONFERENCE, November 5-8

I am happy and excited to be joining over 25 fellow herbal practitioners in this three day event. The event provides incredible opportunities to learn from some of Canada’s leading herbalists.

SAVE $20 off registration fees by entering my code: gudrun20

For workshop details and registration information go to: https://herbconference.com/

Hope to “see” you there!

Green Blessings,

Gudrun

My Jungle Juice Recipe

Thank you for your interest in my signature drink. Here is the information and recipe you were asking for. The u-tube video, demonstrating how to create this delicious concoction, is a segment taken from my DVD, Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone. A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating Your Own Herbal Preparations. The DVD is available from my website, www.herbalinstructions.com or you can contact me directly.

Click link below for recipe:

Jungle Juice

Happy herbaling and green blessings,

Gudrun

 

WILD ROSE – Favourite Recipes for this time of the year

Have you noticed the abundance and colour variations of the Wild Rose flowers this year?

They are so bountiful and a delight to all of our senses. You might have noticed that a lot of different insects use the flowers as their home or resting place.

Wild Rose is also a Bach Flower essence, opening the heart and bringing joy into a person’s life.

Here are two of my all time favorite recipes.

1. WILD ROSE FLOWER WATER

Pick some flower petals and put them in a glass filled with spring water. Let sit in the sun to allow the essence of the flower to infuse into the water. Let sit for 1/2 hour to several hours depending on your taste preference.

Enjoy as is or with some ice. If you wish, you may eat the flower petals.

2. WILD ROSE FLOWER HONEY

Pick the flower petals and place on the honey. Honey that has not been processed is typically hard so you need to soften it slowly at low temperature. You can soften it first and then mix the petals into it, or what I do, I add the petals and let them do “their job” while the honey is softening.

Once the honey is soft, I like to stir the petals in with a wooden chop stick only to watch them come up to the surface again after a while. You can pick out the flower petals if you wish but you can also leave them in the honey.

Enjoy as a spread on a rice cake, on pancakes or with ice cream, or just straight from the spoon – whatever your heart desires.

“THE FLOWERS OF TOMORROW ARE IN THE SEEDS OF TODAY” Author unknown

My mind is filled with thoughts and questions about what is currently happening in the world. Our children, the plant and animal kingdom, and Mother Earth cannot make their own voices heard. We therefore owe it to them to stand up and speak up on behalf of them. Educating ourselves about the current realities and taking action, is critical if we want to be instrumental in creating positive change, securing our rights and freedoms and a planet that will continue to be able to provide in a healthy way for all – now and in the future.

ENJOY STORY OF FLOWERS https://youtu.be/vDpFyHmt0AE

WEEDS FOR WELLNESS – DANDELION

Finally the bright yellow flowers are brightening the landscape – a sure sign that spring is here to stay.

Hard to believe that herbalists have great appreciation for this marvelous creation of nature? We use flowers, buds, leaves and roots as food and medicine. My grand kids nibble on the flowers and young leaves.

Last year I made a crown out of Dandelion flowers for my then 4 year old grand daughter. She was wearing it proudly as we walked into Canadian Tire. With great joy I observed the reactions of customers especially when we were wandering around the Round-up shelf. So much fun!

Be creative and “brave” – eat flowers and young leaves, add both to salads, make a Dandelion flower cold infusion. decorate ice creams and cakes … and most of all, have fun and be grateful for the gift of this plant that most consider to be a pesky weed.

DANDELION – Taraxacum off. – Asteraceae famly
PARTS USED: Roots, stems, leaves and flowers
HARVEST TIME
Roots: Spring before flowering or fall after first frost
Leaves: Early spring, throughout summer (leaves increase in bitter taste with age)
Flowers: When in full bloom
NUTRITIONAL VALUE
Rich in minerals such as calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, and zinc. Vitamins A, B complex, C and D.
Carotenoids, fatty acids, flavenoids and phytosterols.
NOTE: The roots are exceptionally high in vitamin A

THERAPEUTIC ACTIONS
Leaf: Diuretic (high in potassium) – Choleretic (stimulates bile production by liver) – Aperient (mild laxative)
Root: Bitter digestive tonic; nutritive – Choleretic, cholagogue – Aperient, laxative – Anti-rheumatic, anit-inflammatory (animal studies)
Sap: Keratolytic (breaks down outer layer of skin)
INDICATIONS
Leaf: Water retention
Root: Inadequate bile production, gallstones, liver/gall bladder insufficiency, congestive jaundice, Dyspepsia, lack of appetite
Sap of stalks, roots, or leaves: Warts, cankers
FORM OF PREPARATION
Infusions (leaves; flowers) – Decoctions (root) – Tinctures – Vinegars (roots, leaves, flowers) – Infused Oils – Salves – Food (leaves, petals, young roots)
CONTRA-INDICATIONS
No reported toxicity; however some people experience sensitivity reactions