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Rosehips

Rosehips High in Vitamin C

Rosehips are from the Wild Rose (Rosa canina). They are especially high in vitamin C but also contain vitamin A, B1 and B2 in the pulp. Vitamin C was first discovered in Rosehips. Long before the discovery of vitamin C Rosehip tea was used for the common cold and locally for inflamed and bleeding gums.

Most animals are able to manufacture their own vitamin C but because of a lack of a major enzyme in the human liver, the human body is unable to manufacture its own vitamin C. This is why we need to ensure adequate vitamin C intake through our diet or supplements. Rosehips also help to maintain healthy collagen, the substance that holds trillions of cells together in our body.

ROSEHIP TEA

Following are two of my favourite ways of preparing Rosehip tea:

1. My preference is to make a cold infusion and let it sit over night or at least a few hours before straining it. Cold infusions have the advantage of preserving the mineral content provided by the herbs.
2. Make a cold infusion and then slowly bring the infusion with the rosehips to simmer to make a decoction.

For instructions of the different water extractions such as cold infusions and decoctions I suggest you refer to disc 1 of the DVD “Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone”.

http://herbalinstructions.com/order-dvd/

ROSEHIP HARVEST in NOVEMBER

Hard to believe Rosehip harvest in November and my little companion wanted me to share the feast with him.

I cannot believe that I went out harvesting Rosehips at this time of the year. It is truly a gift from nature. Typically I like to go out right after the first frost but this year I was not able to fit it into my busy schedule. I will make a delicious Rosehip with my harvest and enjoy some of them in a tea (for Rosehip tea recipe see previous post).

ROSEHIP SYRUP

In herbal medicine, syrups refer to a form of herbal preparation that preserve the herbs using a sweet medium such as honey. There are many ways to prepare syrups but the following is my favourite for rosehips.

Ingredients

– 1 part Rosehips
– 4-6 parts water (using less water will produce a thicker syrup; rosehips absorb a lot of water)
– Honey
– Brandy (as a preservative)

Directions

– Combine rosehips with water
– Simmer over low heat until you have half the liquid left; in order to increase the extraction of the juice from the rosehips use a potato masher to create a pulp
– Strain the liquid through a sieve first, followed by straining through muslin or cheese cloth. Any particles left in the liquid increase the risk of fermentation and spoilage. It is recommended to use a clean and moist cloth because the moisture will help to trap smaller particles including dust.
– Pour liquid back into pot, bring to simmer over low heat
– Add honey to liquid (i.e. for 1 cup liquid add 1/2 to 1 cup honey) and stir until dissolved
– Remove from heat
– Add Brandy, 1 tablespoon (15ml) for every cup of syrup as a preservative
– Bottle in clean, sterilized jars
– Label and date bottles (ALWAYS label to avoid the creation of what I call “mystery products”)
– ENJOY – for yourself or as a great gift!

Green blessings,
Gudrun

ROSEHIPS and VITAMIN C

Rosehips are from the Wild Rose (Rosa canina).
They are especially high in vitamin C but also contain vitamin A, B1 and B2 in the pulp. Vitamin C was first discovered in Rosehips. Long before the discovery of vitamin C Rosehip tea was used for the common cold and locally for inflamed and bleeding gums.

Most animals are able to manufacture their own vitamin C but because of a lack of a major enzyme in the human liver, the human body is unable to manufacture its own vitamin C. This is why we need to ensure adequate vitamin C intake through our diet or supplements. Rosehips also help to maintain healthy collagen, the substance that holds trillions of cells together in our body.

ROSEHIP TEA

Following are two of my favourite ways of preparing Rosehip tea:

1. My preference is to make a cold infusion and let it sit over night or at least a few hours before straining it. Cold infusions have the advantage of preserving the mineral content provided by the herbs.
2. Make a cold infusion and then slowly bring the infusion with the rosehips to simmer to make a decoction.

For instructions of the different water extractions such as cold infusions and decoctions I suggest you refer to disc 1 of the DVD “Herbal Pharmacy for Everyone”.

http://herbalinstructions.com/order-dvd/